What are some good VO2 Max Workouts?

Triathlete Cornering on Bike Course at Pittsburgh Triathlon

VO2 max is typically achieved in an all-out effort of 3-8 minutes depending on your genetics and fitness. Outstanding athletes may be able to hold their true VO2 max for a full 8 minutes, but most people cannot.

The whole idea of interval work (at any intensity) is to use shorter sets with rests to add up to a total of more work that you would otherwise, be able to do as a continuous effort. You can reach your VO2 max after about 30 seconds of starting an interval at the appropriate intensity, but after you stop or slow down, our oxygen needs diminish and your heart rate slows, and you are no longer at your VO2 max. When you start your next interval, your “bucket” has only partially emptied depending on the intensity of your rest interval (how low your HR or Power or Vo2 drops during the rest)…which determines how far you need to fill the bucket up again to be back at your Vo2 Max.

So if the goal is to get as much work in as possible at VO2 max
efforts, you can see how shorter, more intense rest intervals would
let you reach your VO2 max effort more quickly once you re-start a
given interval.

So if the goal is to get as much work in as possible at VO2 max
efforts, you can see how shorter, more intense rest intervals would
let you reach your VO2 max effort more quickly once you re-start a
given interval.

So the next question is how long should the intervals be?

Tabata intervals (10 sec max, 20 sec rest) will hit a component of VO2
eventually, but they are really best for anaerobic conditioning.
Billat’s intervals (30 at vo2 max-30 at “rest”) are great for an
introduction to VO2 max efforts for either newbies, or early in the
season, with little worry for injury. In addition, her work has shown
that after a 4-6 week block of VO2 interval work, only 2-3 minutes of
VO2 work per week are required to sustain your gains before they drop
off to far. So you can cycle your VO2 work early in the season and
see some benefits, taper them off in the spring time and resume them
prior to or during race season. Of course, if you can tolerate the
longer intervals (2, 3, 5 minutes or more) at your VO2 max power, you
will pack in the most time at VO2 max.

Finally, about what power to do your intervals at…since by
definition, your 5 minute power is going to be close to your VO2 max
effort (and could only be confirmed with expired gas testing in a
lab), you might as well use that 5 minute power as your target power
for your VO2 intervals.

There’s no right or wrong as long as you are applying physiology
appropriately. The most important part is to have a plan to follow
and be able to measure your progress. Ways of measuring your progress
could be to do a block of VO2 intervals for 4-6 weeks as part of your
regular training with a progression that makes sense, and then measure
either your all out 5 min power again, OR hold your 465W and see how
long you can hold it after the training block.

So if the goal is to get as much work in as possible at VO2 max
efforts, you can see how shorter, more intense rest intervals would
let you reach your VO2 max effort more quickly once you re-start a
given interval.

So the next question is how long should the intervals be?

Tabata intervals (10-sec max, 20-sec rest) will hit a component of VO2
eventually, but they are really best for anaerobic conditioning.
Billat’s intervals (30 at vo2 max-30 at “rest”) are great for an
introduction to VO2 max efforts for either newbies, or early in the
season, with little worry for injury. In addition, her work has shown
that after a 4-6 week block of VO2 interval work, only 2-3 minutes of
VO2 work per week are required to sustain your gains before they drop
off to far. So you can cycle your VO2 work early in the season and
see some benefits, taper them off in the springtime and resume them
prior to or during race season. Of course, if you can tolerate the
longer intervals (2, 3, 5 minutes or more) at your VO2 max power, you
will pack in the most time at VO2 max.

Finally, about what power to do your intervals at…since by
definition, your 5-minute power is going to be close to your VO2 max
effort (and could only be confirmed with expired gas testing in a
lab), you might as well use that 5-minute power as your target power
for your VO2 intervals.

There’s no right or wrong as long as you are applying physiology
appropriately. The most important part is to have a plan to follow
and be able to measure your progress. Ways of measuring your progress
could be to do a block of VO2 intervals for 4-6 weeks as part of your
regular training with a progression that makes sense, and then measure
either your all-out 5 min power again OR hold your 465W and see how
long you can hold it after the training block.

I hope that gives you some more ideas on how to design integrate VO2 max sets into your training.

This article originally appeared on my retired blog, exercisephysiologyMD.com in January of 2009

So You Want to be a Triathlon Coach? Here’s your Reading List…

Triathlon Coaching - Steel City Endurance The most common question I get from folks wanting to increase their knowledge is, “What triathlon coaching books should I read?”

While it’s certainly hard to whittle down the list, these were the first handful of books & scientific papers to come to mind.  As they say, always go with your initial instincts!

Caveat…I have an entire bookshelf of coaching books plus many I haven’t read yet, but these are the books & articles I would START with.  They will help the aspiring triathlon coach or self-coached athlete form a solid foundation upon which they can begin filling in with no end of online-self-coaching articles.

There may be some notable absences from this list…it’s not necessarily intentional, but if you would like to add a book to the list, please leave a comment!

Scientific Training for Triathletes, Phil Skiba, MD, $20

The Triathletes Guide to Training with Power, Phil Skiba, MD, $20

Training and Racing with a Power Meter, 2nd Ed, Hunter Allen & Andy Coggan, 2010  $24.95

Triathlon Swimming Made Easy, Terry Laughlin (Discount 10%  “coachsuzanne” at checkout) $9.95 E-book, In Paperback $33 new.

Daniels’ Running Formula-3rd Edition, Jack Daniels, 2013, $21.95

Intervals, Thresholds, and Long Slow Distance:  the Role of Intensity and Duration in Endurance Training, 2009.  Free Download

Endurance exercise performance: the physiology of champions, Michael Joyner & Edward Coyle, 2008, Free Download

 

So for about $100 you can have 7 excellent coaching & self-coaching references that cover essentials of endurance physiology, high intensity training, run training, bike training, swim training & fitness from some of the most notable and knowledable authors.

One of the fantastic aspects of triathlon is that all of these authors are alive & well and accessible by email, webinar or by corning them at a conference on endurance sports.

What are some of your favorites?

 

 

Introducing Coach Anne-Marie Alderson

At Steel City Endurance we are happy to introduce associate coach Anne-Marie Alderson.  Anne-Marie is a certified International Triathlon Coaching Association Level 1 coach.  She has been training with Steel City Endurance for the past 3 years and during that time has had great success as an athlete.  Anne-Marie has been able to apply much of what she has learned through being a coached athlete to her own training and is eager to work with triathletes, cyclists & runners to help them achieve their goals as well.

 

Racing Credentials

USAT Age Group National Championships Qualifier in 2010, 2011, and 2012

Elite Amateur Designation in 2011 & 2012

First Place Woman, Dirty Dozen, Pittsburgh 2011

 

PRs

5k 20:40

Half Marathon 1:37:55 (New Pittsburgh Half-marathon 2013!)

Olympic Distance:  2:28:28

Half-Iron Distance:  5:14:28

Coaches

David Burke hammers on the front stretch at an Aliquippa Spring Criterium, April 2006.
Name:David Burke

Associate Coach

David is has over 10 years of experienced racing mountain and road bikes and is currently working his way back up through the ranks. He is a certified Level 3 USA Cycling/USCF Coach available for monthly coaching. David is also writes articles that can be found on the Steel City Endurance website and newsletter.

Climbing Seal Rock from the pacific ocean up to the Presidio, San Francisco, CA
Name:Suzanne Atkinson

Age:38

Suzanne is a former Outward Bound Instructor who is now a certified USA Triathlon Level 1 and USA Cycling/USCF level 2 coach. She competes in Sprint and Olympic distance triathlons, mountain biking races and local criterium road races as a Cat 4. She is also a former Outward Bound Instructor and Emergency Medicine Physician.

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